A vegetarian Burmese Khow Suey

A sister-in-law of mine once told me that what we call Burmese Khow Suey only exists in our Indian imaginations. In her three year stay in Yangon, she didn’t come across anything remotely like it .

However, I first came upon Khow Suey when I was all of 13 years old. A much travelled aunt who used to make a big production of being invited by her , once included my brother and me when she invited my parents to her much prized Sunday brunch

. To say I was gob smacked is an understatement. For me it was like dying and going to heaven.

For several years I used to think that  Khow Suey was the ultimate in exotic cuisine and kept her reluctantly shared recipe close to my chest. That was before the now defunct Busaba opened up Burmese cuisine to the everyday Mumbaikar.

The other day I was slurping down my chicken Khow Suey at Palladium Social when Hubby Dear expressed a keenness to try the coconut curry.

Since he had assiduously passed up the Khow Suey every time it was made at home, I was once again gob smacked !

And what was more shocking was that he asked me to make a Vegetarian version for Sunday’s lunch .

So here’s what I did 

Burmese khow suey

Burmese khow suey

Ingredients

  • For the curry
  • 1 x 200 g coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 1 small onion grated
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic ginger paste
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/2-1 teaspoon red chill powder ( depending on how fiery you like it)
  • 1 heaped teaspoon ground coriander powder
  • 1 heaped tablespoon chick pea flour ( besan)
  • For the vegetables
  • 1 cup pre-cooked Nutrela Soya nuggets
  • 1 cup chopped zucchini
  • 3 baby corn
  • 1 cup chopped broccoli
  • 1/4 cup red bell pepper chopped
  • 1/4 cup yellow bell pepper chopped
  • 1/2 cup finely sliced mushroom
  • For the garnish
  • 1 finely sliced onion made into a barista ( deep fried to a crisp golden brown)
  • 2 teaspoons golden fried chopped garlic
  • chopped coriander
  • chopped green onion
  • coarsely ground roast peanuts
  • crumbled boiled egg
  • lemon quarters

Instructions

  • To make the curry :
  • Heat the oil in a pan and add the grated onion and stir till pink. Then add the garlic ginger paste and continue stirring. Reduce the heat to avoid sticking.
  • When the onion is golden brown, add the turmeric, red chilli powder and coriander powder. Roast till you get the aroma of roasted spices ( around a minute or so).
  • Add the chick pea flower and continue stirring till the flour is slightly roasted.
  • Toss in the vegetables one by one starting out with the baby corn, then broccoli, mushroom and bell peppers. Finally add in the cooked soya nuggets.
  • Add just enough water and cover with a lid .
  • Allow the pot to simmer till the vegetables are just done.
  • Remove the lid and add the coconut milk.
  • Once again allow the curry to simmer - letting it thicken a bit.
  • Adjust the salt before serving
  • Serve with steamed noodles or steamed white rice.
  • Khow Suey is served on top of the noodles/rice with all the accompaniments added on top . Mix together to get an interesting mix of crunch and flavour.
  • You could add a dash of lime if you like slightly tangy, citrusy flavour.
http://foodities.in/veg-burmese-khow-suey/

Stale bread ? Make Pudding.

Bread pudding is an easy to make dessert that pleases every palate. A great way to use up old bread too!

Let them eat breadImage for let them eat bread pudding

Just before the French Revolution broke out, millions of Frenchmen were starving. It is assumed that their Queen Marie Antoinette, is said to have told her subjects

Qu’ils mangent de la brioche”—“Let them eat cake.”Oct 24, 2012.

I would have been enraged too, had I heard these words and it is no wonder then that the queen lost her head.

However, this is one ‘cake’ that will have your family asking for more.

How to make bread pudding

Generously butter 4-6 slices of bread. Tear them into pieces and place in a deep baking dish. Intersperse with dried black currants.

Take 3 tablespoons of sugar in another bowl and whisk together with an egg. Add a cup of milk and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla essence. Continue whisking till the sugar dissolves.

Pour the whisked egg and milk mixture over the bread. The bread should be completely soaked and if you run short of milk, you can easily add some more.

Pop the dish into an oven and cook at 100 C for 20 minutes or till the top has just browned.

Serve warm either plain or with some cream or vanilla ice cream.

TIP

You could grate some nutmeg as well in the milk and egg mixture for added flavour.

Black currants give a special tangy crunch but you could substitute with regular raisins too.

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Eggs Perfectly Scrambled.

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series The joys of a Mumbai Winter

 

The secret of the Perfectly Scrambled Egg

 

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Breakfast is the perfect start to a day. Especially when it’s a good old scrambled egg to begin the day with. The soft, fluffy light as air, scrambled egg on a thick, buttered toast . It’s quite an art to make the perfect scrambled egg. Cook it a tad too much and it becomes hard and lumpy, with a runny liquid that makes the toast a soft and soggy.

So what is the secret to the perfectly, scrambled egg? One that leaves it light, soft and warm as it slips down your throat leaving you really satisfied.

It’s simple really :

The secret of the perfect scrambled egg is to stir in a just the right amount  of milk in a lightly beaten egg and cook over a slow fire, stirring all the time to prevent a lumpy mess.  Add a dash of butter and a pinch of salt to the egg and milk mixture and heat gently over slow heat till the egg just begins to set into a soft, custard. That’s the time , to take it off the heat and gently pour this gooey mess over a hot, buttered toast.

I allow the egg to cook in its own heat as I take the dish to the table. There I open my fresh newspaper and  sit down to a hearty breakfast . As I sip my cup of hot steaming coffee, I cut the toast into small squares and delicately lift one morsel at a time. I  pop it into my mouth and wait for a million sensations to just burst forth. It is a warm, fuzzy feeling that fills my entire being as I savour bit by bit of my perfectly scrambled egg.

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Alaskan Salmon with Orzo Salad

This week   #BlueApron , which we resumed  this week , introduced me to a very interesting Alaskan Salmon on a bed of Orzo Salad.

I learnt some very interesting facts with this meal

  • The Alaskan Salmon is a country cousin of the Norwegian Salmon that I’ve relished as thin slices smoked to perfection and eaten plain or in tiny sandwiches .
  • This ray finned fish is found in the cold waters of both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans . You can find out more about the Wild Alaskan Salmon here.
  • The Salmon like the trout live in the oceans but return to the fresh water upstream to breed .
  • The salmon is an oily fish and is comparable to our Indian Rawas

image for Alaskan Salmon with Orzo Salad

  • Orzo is a wheat pasta that looks like RICE! This short grain like pasta is ideal for soups and salads.
  • You can make a salad with French Beans.

As usual, #BlueApron provided all the ingredients and the knick knacks as they call the accompanying condiments essential for the dish.

how to make the alaskan salmon and orzo salad.

I am  blogging on my iPhone with a baby on my lap so cannot give the exact amounts now. But I just had to share this with you. If you are an experienced cook ( or an adventurous one) you could try this. Or wait till I post the exact recipe soon. 

With salt and pepper as seasoning, some finely minced garlic sautéed in olive oil, a handful of green beans , a sprig of spring onion and a dash of lemon juice it was easy to make the salad with the orzo that was cooked al dents.

And again the fillets of salmon that were seasoned with salt and pepper , were seared in a non stick pan in a drizzle of olive oil. The fillets were turned just once ( cooking each side for 4 minutes) .

Now isn’t that easy?

The next time you’re looking to make an easy and healthy fish dish, why don’t you try this?

My own suggestion 

I haven’t tried this but when I get back I’m going to try this with Red Snapper . This is a nice firm fleshed fish that lends itself well to fillets and grilling

The Dutch Kitchen at Schiphol

If you are transiting in Amsterdam for an onward flight to or from the New World, the new transit area is a comfortable place to lounge around in during the layover of a few hours. 
Apart from the regular shopping for shopaholics , there is a delightful new restaurant offering a taste of  Holland. 

Of course the potato chips ( French fries) that accompanied the chunks of crisply fried kibbeling are not a patch on the ones you get on the street , particularly off Dam Square, but nonetheless they are well worth an eat. 

Also one of my favourites are the min pancakes which look a bit like idli dusted with powdered sugar 

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I was looking for the famous bitterballen but had to make do with these croquettes instead
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Regular Dutch Pancakes and Kibbeling and chips
Of course I forgot to mention the Dutch Apple pie which is quite unlike any other – with its soft crumbly crust covering a crunchy Apple filling and topped with a generous helping of soft, whipped cream. 

Now isn’t that worth spending some time at Schiphol airport ?