Shankarpale for Diwali and all year round

My grandmother used to love making these tiny diamond shaped goodies all year round and very often I would come home to the house smelling of them being fried to a crisp golden brown as granny fished  them out of the kadahi with her big zhara or slotted spoon. This year with little P being around to enjoy Diwali and at the age when he appreciates finger food, I decided to make them myself. Made of wholewheat flour and pure home made ghee just slightly sweet, they are the perfect little bites for little tykes on the go.These don’t look too good because I’ve been out of the kitchen and out of practice for a bit, but I assure you they taste great.

Here’s what I did:

I got together

  •  3 -4   cups of whole wheat flour or maida or a mix of both
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 1 cup of milk or water
  • 1 cup of pure ghee
  • Ghee for deep frying

I sieved the wheat flour and kept it aside while I put the sugar, ghee and milk in a pan and brought it to a quick boil.

I took the pan off the fire and added as much wheat flour as could be absorbed to make a nice soft dough. Since the liquid was hot, I made sure to use a spoon to stir in the flour! Then I kept the dough aside for a while.

A few hours later, I kneaded the dough once more and then rolled it out into pastry sheets about 2-3 mm thick and ran a pastry cutter wheel through it to make the diamond shapes. In the meanwhile, I kept some ghee in a kadahi to heat up and then slowly added the diamond shapes one by one. I reduced the heat a bit and fried them till the ghee stopped bubbling and the shankarpale turned golden brown.

I took them out with a slotted spoon, draining off excess fat and allowed them to drain and cool on a kitchen towel. Then I stored them in an airtight tin to open up on Diwali day.

Nota Bene

Shankarpale which look simple enough to make can be quite tricky. If you substitute the milk with water as many people like to do, or even reduce the quantity of ghee your shankarpale can become hard enough for you to break a tooth! But if you more or less follow this recipe, you will get perfectly crunchy yet melt in your mouth shankarpale to die for.

Equally misleading is the amount of time you will take- plan for at least half an hour because the shankarpale take time to cook but an easy way out would be to use a wide mouthed shallow kadahi or a deep frying pan which will hold more shankarpale than the regular kadahi!

 

Published by

bellybytes

An accidental cook who likes to travel, read, watch movies and do yoga. Currently busy with full time granny duties.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge